Tag Archives: college student

10 Tips for a Smooth Transition from Online to In-person

We’ve all spent the last year glued to our screens, whether it’s trying to decipher what our professor is saying or scrolling through Tik Tok. In the midst of all the Zoom meetings, Discord chats, and Slack messages we have forgotten how to thrive in an in-person learning setting. So, here are ten tips on how to thrive during the transition from online to in-person learning, interaction, and life.

1. You need to calm down

After more than a year of spending time stuck at home with Tiktok being our only form of social interaction, it can be tempting to just say yes to every social invitation that comes our way. But, no matter what you do you cannot make up for the dumpster fire that was 2020, and acknowledging that is important. The pandemic has changed every aspect of our lives and that includes social interaction. It’s okay to want to stay in on a Friday night and binge-watch “Grey’s Anatomy,” you don’t need to force yourself to go out in the fear that you will regret it if there is another Lockdown. Understanding that we cannot make all our decisions based on the fear that the past will repeat itself will only benefit us in our post-pandemic life. 

2. Develop a routine

A big part of the anxiety that accompanies our transition back to in-person classes is ambiguity. Being able to have routines— even for the smallest parts of our lives— can help immensely. Whether it’s having a three-step morning routine that involves making your bed, putting on clothes, and making yourself look presentable for class, or an elaborate make-up routine, having one part of the day remain constant will help structure the rest of your day.

3. Get an alarm clock

It can be tempting to use your phone as an alarm but it’s also the reason you’re late every day. Not only is the alarm on your phone designed so that the snooze button is more prominent than the off one, but it also enables you to scroll through social media first thing in the morning. Having an actual alarm clock not only prevents you from mindlessly scrolling through your Instagram feed, but it also means you’re going to hit snooze a lot less. If you’re like me and are paranoid about not waking up on time, keeping the clock at the farthest end of the room will ensure that you wake up. 

4. Engage with your classes

Zoom university has made it easy to not engage with material during class and going back in-person seems especially daunting when you can’t whip out your phone and scroll through social media when your professor goes on a long and boring tangent. However, identifying aspects of each class that you enjoy, whether it’s the friends you have made in that class or your genuine interest in the subject, will make you dread it a lot less.

5. Treat yourself

Whether it’s getting Boba with friends, watching a movie, or gorging on a pint of ice-cream(I am definitely not speaking from personal experience), find a way to reward yourself at the end of the week. The treat doesn’t need to be expensive— it could even be dancing to Taylor Swift music in your room. These treats act as a reminder for what a great job you’re doing and also motivate you to get through the week.

6. Stay safe

We are still in the midst of a pandemic and following COVID guidelines are crucial for keeping yourself and your fellow Longhorns safe. Make sure you download the Protect Texas app and fill out your symptom survey daily as well as get tested weekly. Wearing a mask in classes may seem strange, but it’s the only thing stopping us from going back online.

7. Plan, plan and then plan some more

Now that we are in-person, having a daily planner is essential. Not only does planning your day the night before gives you peace of mind, but it also means you won’t accidentally forget a class or a meeting. Having a monthly planner as well will help you keep track of your assignment due dates. Google Calendar and Outlook are great online planners, but nothing beats pen and paper. 

8. Catch some ZZZs

Lack of sleep is overhyped in college. Just because Brad from your Econ class hasn’t slept since Tuesday and is feeling great doesn’t mean you should follow in his footsteps. Lack of sleep catches up on you when you least expect it and it makes you more prone to illness. With the endless stream of assignments, it can seem hard to get seven hours of sleep but remember those hours of sleep will prevent you from the embarrassment of being woken up by your professor in your eight a.m. class. 

9. Find your style

Now that pajamas are no longer the informal uniform of college students across the world, finding something to wear in the morning can seem foreign. But remember it’s also the perfect opportunity to play around with new styles and try out outfits that are cute from the shoulders down— now that you’re no longer a box on a screen.

10. You are not alone

Remember that you’re not the only one navigating this “new normal” and, yes, you will make mistakes but remember so will everyone else. We are all in this together (cue cheesy High School Musical music) and going back to in-person classes means we are moving forward away from the catastrophe that was the pandemic.

Featured image by Serena Rodriguez

6 Tips For Living Off Campus

Off-campus living has been one of the most enriching experiences of my years in college. Not only did I get a taste of being on my own, but I also got to learn a little bit about being an adult— bills, commutes and finally getting to turn the thermostat down when it’s too hot.

It can be overwhelming to try and tackle this experience as an 18 or 19-year-old in the middle of class schedules, job searches and everything else, so here are some tips to live the best off-campus life.

1. Pick a Place You Like

My apartment is 20 minutes off-campus, but I would much rather be here than somewhere close in a cramped sardine can. I knew I would likely be picking an apartment complex I’d spend the rest of my college years at, and wanted to find a place that I wanted to go home to every day. So, find an apartment that makes you smile, and not one that you’re just trying to stick out for a semester or two.

2. Background Check Those Roommates

When it comes to the off-campus apartment life, you’ll be picking your own roommates. If they’re not friends, then definitely meet up beforehand and talk to them. You’re going to be spending so much time with this person, and sleeping across the hall from them at night. Make sure they’re bearable. I have heard an abundance of roommate horror stories and trust me when I say you don’t want to be the one having to tell them.

3. Research Locations

When picking a place, check out the area. Try to find somewhere in a nice area with a grocery store and some of your favorite places nearby. This is your main location so it’s always nice to have everything you need around. Beyond that, it’s good to try and find safer areas to put some roots down in for the next few years.

4. Figure Out Your Budget

The biggest reason I chose not to live in West Campus was affordability. I’d much rather commute to school every morning than spend $1,200 a month for a shoebox. It was outside my budget and even with my student loans, I probably wouldn’t have been able to do it. By figuring out what I could afford I was able to find a nice place within my budget.

5. Don’t Isolate

Living off-campus can feel isolating sometimes because you’re so far away from the action and, a lot of the time, your friends. Don’t let the distance isolate you from campus. Join clubs and make time to see the people you care about. Sometimes it’s a 10 to 20 minute drive, but it’s worth it to get the socialization you need to have an enjoyable college experience.

6. Plan For The Commute

Make sure you know how long the drive to campus is with morning traffic so that you’re not running down Speedway to get to class on time. And even more important, make sure you have a parking plan! Sign up for a parking pass and try to pick a place that’s convenient for you. If all else fails, you can always find room in one of the garages on campus or find some street parking nearby. If you don’t have a car, be sure to check out bus routes or, if you’re close enough, the time it takes to walk to class.

Finding a place to live can be tough, but the place you go home to everyday is supposed to be your escape from the rollercoaster of college, so make sure you’re investing the proper amount of time in finding it. Find a place that makes you feel happy, so when you’re cramming for midterms at three in the morning you’ll at least have some comfort in the fact you’re doing it in a safe, inviting space.