Tag Archives: college life

Student’s in Class

Created by Francessca Conde

Student B who took notes on her iPad

Student A – a TA who was usually working on her other assignments during class

Student D- sat in the very last row

Student F – the other TA– she would online shop during the class LOL

Student E – he always had a mask on so shoutout to him.

A professor who was very stylish.

Student G – She was super nice and always had something pink-colored on her body.

Student C – Who I only ever saw once

11 Moving Tips to Consider During Move-Out

As the academic school year is winding down and summer is fast approaching. That can only mean one thing; it’s the season for moving out! Getting to go back home is exciting, but the thought of having to transport all of your belongings within a certain time constraint can certainly be daunting. Students living on and off-campus will soon have to pack up all their belongings to make the journey back home. Here are some things you can consider before and during the packing process. 

  1. Start packing ahead of time. 

This might seem insignificant at first, but getting a head start can never do any harm. Many students think that moving out won’t take too much time, but there is definitely more work to be done than one might initially assume. It is easier to pack little by little instead of trying to cram everything in random boxes the day before moving out.

  1. Make a mental list of everything that you need to do.

 This is another step that might seem like a waste of time, but I can assure you; it is definitely important and worthwhile! Students are so used to seeing their room that they get desensitized to how much stuff they actually have. Think back to extra supplies, miscellaneous furniture/appliances, seasonal clothes, and other trinkets that you might have tucked away in drawers or closets out of sight. Do a scan of your space and re-familiarize yourself with all your possessions. 

  1. Learn to let go of items you aren’t/haven’t used. 

Throw away all the items you’ve been hoarding throughout the semester. Yes, this means you have to take out the trash that you’ve been too lazy to take out. Make sure to scan your room and get rid of anything that you don’t need to eliminate unnecessary items that take up space. You’ll be surprised at how much good a bit of decluttering can do to your mental state.

  1. Separate your things from your roommate’s belongings. 

Although not everyone has a roommate, it can be applied to everyone in different contexts. If you do have a roommate, it is important to talk to them to decide who will take previously shared appliances/goods. Even if you live alone, make sure to go around looking for objects that your friends might have forgotten in your space or items that you’ve previously borrowed and never given back. 

  1. Use big boxes separated into different categories so that it is easy to differentiate the items when reopening them back at home.

Not everyone has the resources to pack in big moving boxes, but sticking to containers with a solid structure is always recommended when making a big move. It’s easier to carry out in the short term, easier to manage and reduces the chances of damage during the transportation process.

  1. Make sure to have labels on everything after categorizing your belongings.

This might take some time in the beginning, but it will be useful in the end when you have to find something really quickly. Categorizing items also makes it easier to pack since everything has a given place it needs to be. It is really tempting to skimp on this step during the process, but naming boxes/containers will save you more time in the long run especially when you unpack. 

  1. Make use of towels, clothes, and other soft linen items to act like bubble wrap/packing peanuts. 

Anything that takes up less space is useful, and in this case, it can also save some money. Instead of investing in bubble wrap or foam to shelter the more fragile or glass items, substitute it for things you already have to pack: thick padded sweaters, fluffy towels, fuzzy socks, etc. 

  1. Roll up clothes, towels, blankets, and any other foldable item.

The biggest thing about packing to make a big move is to optimize space. Although everyone has their personal preferred style of folding clothing items, I highly recommend the rolling method during move-out. Rolling up clothing items tightly will save so much space, and the compact style makes it easier to move around. 

  1. Heavier items on the bottom, lighter items on the top.

This might seem like common sense, but it’s amazing how much we can forget when we are rushing in order to get the moving part over with. Unless you want to be dealing with bent or broken items, it is smart to always keep in mind that heavier things go on the bottom of the boxes. Yes– this means that you have to empty out the box and restart when you find something towards the end of packing that needs to be packed at the bottom. 

  1. Make use of school backpacks, duffel bags, etc.

Have all the essential items that you use the most in your backpack, like your laptop, phone, chargers, and earphones since things can get hectic and lost during the process of moving out. This also means that all your other bags can have a role too. Many students pack away unused bags into boxes, but why not make use of them? Bags are designed to store belongings in a contained space while also making them easier to transport. 

  1. Avoid being lazy and throwing everything in one box.

This might sound like something that is obvious, but moving can be mentally and physically draining. This also means that giving up is a temptation that will constantly nag you in the back of your mind. Definitely try to avoid shoving everything in boxes in an unorganized manner due to frustration. 

Everyone has been through the stressful process of moving, and sometimes it might feel like giving in to the anxiety is an easy fix. Worry not; take a deep breath and continue on slowly. Put on some relaxing music or a podcast you enjoy in the background while working, and it’s okay to take it step by step slowly. When starting, it might seem like there is no end to the monumental  task but remember, there is always a rewarding end waiting at the finish line for each journey!

How To De-stress: Burnout Edition

It’s that point in the semester where everything seems dreadful and mentally draining. So here’s a gentle reminder that it’s okay to take a break from schoolwork and relax. What are some ways to do that? You’ve come to the right place because I’ve got a list!

  1. Watch something you love: 

We’ve all got a comfort show that always puts us in a good mood. Having a good laugh can help relieve stress after tense study sessions. Even if it isn’t a comedy, watching something that makes you happy is what matters, whether that be true crime or cartoons. Pro tip: anything on Disney + is great for a pick-me-up, tbh.

  1. Read

Sometimes we’re so caught up in homework that we disregard the nine unread books that lie idly sitting on our shelf. Try reading one of them, or maybe finishing the one you already started. Reading books is a good way to pass time, and forget about everything else happening in the world. You’re stuck in someone else’s fantasy when you read, hopefully, a good one. And hey, at least it’s not your schoolwork! 

  1. Enjoy your favorite comfort foods

Just the other day, I made matcha-white chocolate chip cookies with my sister and instantly felt better after eating them. After hours of homework, eating something nice is rewarding. Treat yourself, even if that means ordering that expensive Uber Eats meal. Trust me; you deserve it

  1. Play a fun game

When I want a small break, I crack open the good ol’ Nintendo Switch and play a game. Lately, I’ve been playing “Kirby and the Forgotten Land” for a bit of fun before returning to homework. Of course, it doesn’t have just to console games but could be board games, cards, or whatever you find fun. Cool math games, anyone?

  1. Take a nap

Nothing feels better than a nice nap! Don’t force yourself to stay awake if you’re exhausted and haven’t gotten enough rest. Naps aren’t a waste of time if you use them wisely. Your work can wait till you’re in a better mental and physical state. Go rest!

  1. Let it out! 

When in doubt, scream, sigh or sing, as it will all relieve that pent-up stress. If you’re able, go ahead and just let out a good scream. If not, sighing works too, as it relieves tension in the upper body. Maybe, you feel the need to sing your favorite song, such as “As It Was” by Harry Styles or “Pied Piper” by BTS (my current favorites). Doing so helps release endorphins and hormones like oxytocin, putting you in a better mood.

When things get tough as finals approach, make sure to take a break. Burnout hits pretty hard and can take a toll on your mental health. Everything on this list has personally helped me feel better during burnout season, and I hope it helps you too. Remember, you’ve got this, and we’re almost there!

Featured Image By Morgan Scruggs

What NOT To Do After Getting a Bad Midterm Grade

So, you didn’t do well on a midterm. Maybe you studied for days in advance and felt super confident in the material. Maybe you didn’t study a bit and went in cold. Regardless of what led up to this grade, unfortunately, there’s not much you can do now… about the grade itself, at least. While I completely understand the urge to switch majors or drop out of college, there are other ways to recover from a bad midterm grade.

Don’t silently wonder what you did wrong. The first thing I like to do after getting a midterm grade back is talk to the professor or TA for the class. You may not be able to change your grade, but you can certainly learn from your past mistakes so that you perform better on the next test. By going to talk to your grader, you’ll also be proving that you truly care about the course, which they’ll definitely appreciate.

Don’t waste too much time dwelling. You can totally buy yourself a pint of ice cream and put on a feel-good movie while you process. We’ve all been there. And you know what, it’s okay to do that for a little while. It’s okay to sit in your disappointment and feel all of your feelings in full. It’s just not okay to get stuck there.

Don’t do anything impulsive. I may or may not have seriously considered getting a tattoo and/or dying my hair pink after I didn’t do as well as I wanted to on my first midterm. That impulse lasted less than 24 hours, and I’m glad I didn’t act on it. As tempting as it may be, there’s definitely no need to drop the class or transfer to A&M. You will recover.

Don’t stagnate your study habits. If you didn’t do well on a midterm, there’s probably something you can change about the way you’re studying. Maybe try forming a study group or starting your review a few days earlier. College is all about learning and growing, so try out new study techniques and find out what works best for you.

Don’t give up! Failing a midterm or not meeting your expectations for a midterm grade doesn’t mean there’s no hope for getting your target overall grade in the class. It also doesn’t mean you’re doomed to fail out of college and not succeed in your future career. One bad midterm grade doesn’t define you as a student or a person. 

We’ve all been there. At one time or another, all of us have experienced failures. Accepting those failures is hard, but they can be taken as an opportunity to grow. It’s important to shift our mindset and view failures for what they are: learning moments.

10 Tips for a Smooth Transition from Online to In-person

We’ve all spent the last year glued to our screens, whether it’s trying to decipher what our professor is saying or scrolling through Tik Tok. In the midst of all the Zoom meetings, Discord chats, and Slack messages we have forgotten how to thrive in an in-person learning setting. So, here are ten tips on how to thrive during the transition from online to in-person learning, interaction, and life.

1. You need to calm down

After more than a year of spending time stuck at home with Tiktok being our only form of social interaction, it can be tempting to just say yes to every social invitation that comes our way. But, no matter what you do you cannot make up for the dumpster fire that was 2020, and acknowledging that is important. The pandemic has changed every aspect of our lives and that includes social interaction. It’s okay to want to stay in on a Friday night and binge-watch “Grey’s Anatomy,” you don’t need to force yourself to go out in the fear that you will regret it if there is another Lockdown. Understanding that we cannot make all our decisions based on the fear that the past will repeat itself will only benefit us in our post-pandemic life. 

2. Develop a routine

A big part of the anxiety that accompanies our transition back to in-person classes is ambiguity. Being able to have routines— even for the smallest parts of our lives— can help immensely. Whether it’s having a three-step morning routine that involves making your bed, putting on clothes, and making yourself look presentable for class, or an elaborate make-up routine, having one part of the day remain constant will help structure the rest of your day.

3. Get an alarm clock

It can be tempting to use your phone as an alarm but it’s also the reason you’re late every day. Not only is the alarm on your phone designed so that the snooze button is more prominent than the off one, but it also enables you to scroll through social media first thing in the morning. Having an actual alarm clock not only prevents you from mindlessly scrolling through your Instagram feed, but it also means you’re going to hit snooze a lot less. If you’re like me and are paranoid about not waking up on time, keeping the clock at the farthest end of the room will ensure that you wake up. 

4. Engage with your classes

Zoom university has made it easy to not engage with material during class and going back in-person seems especially daunting when you can’t whip out your phone and scroll through social media when your professor goes on a long and boring tangent. However, identifying aspects of each class that you enjoy, whether it’s the friends you have made in that class or your genuine interest in the subject, will make you dread it a lot less.

5. Treat yourself

Whether it’s getting Boba with friends, watching a movie, or gorging on a pint of ice-cream(I am definitely not speaking from personal experience), find a way to reward yourself at the end of the week. The treat doesn’t need to be expensive— it could even be dancing to Taylor Swift music in your room. These treats act as a reminder for what a great job you’re doing and also motivate you to get through the week.

6. Stay safe

We are still in the midst of a pandemic and following COVID guidelines are crucial for keeping yourself and your fellow Longhorns safe. Make sure you download the Protect Texas app and fill out your symptom survey daily as well as get tested weekly. Wearing a mask in classes may seem strange, but it’s the only thing stopping us from going back online.

7. Plan, plan and then plan some more

Now that we are in-person, having a daily planner is essential. Not only does planning your day the night before gives you peace of mind, but it also means you won’t accidentally forget a class or a meeting. Having a monthly planner as well will help you keep track of your assignment due dates. Google Calendar and Outlook are great online planners, but nothing beats pen and paper. 

8. Catch some ZZZs

Lack of sleep is overhyped in college. Just because Brad from your Econ class hasn’t slept since Tuesday and is feeling great doesn’t mean you should follow in his footsteps. Lack of sleep catches up on you when you least expect it and it makes you more prone to illness. With the endless stream of assignments, it can seem hard to get seven hours of sleep but remember those hours of sleep will prevent you from the embarrassment of being woken up by your professor in your eight a.m. class. 

9. Find your style

Now that pajamas are no longer the informal uniform of college students across the world, finding something to wear in the morning can seem foreign. But remember it’s also the perfect opportunity to play around with new styles and try out outfits that are cute from the shoulders down— now that you’re no longer a box on a screen.

10. You are not alone

Remember that you’re not the only one navigating this “new normal” and, yes, you will make mistakes but remember so will everyone else. We are all in this together (cue cheesy High School Musical music) and going back to in-person classes means we are moving forward away from the catastrophe that was the pandemic.

Featured image by Serena Rodriguez