Category Archives: Wellness & Fitness

Get Ready for Summer With These Clothing Trends

Summer is just around the corner. So put the long sleeves and jeans away and revamp your closet with some of these cute summer clothing trends. 

Corset Tops

Cosets have been in for a while, but summer is a great time to wear the strapless and bright-colored corset tops again. Floral-designed corsets are perfect for the season and make a plain outfit look a little more upscale. 

Photo by Joshua Rondeau on Unsplash

Bermuda Shorts

Baggy, long mom jeans have been the go-to pants for the fall and winter. However, bermuda shorts are making a comeback this summer. Baggy, long shorts go well with almost any tank top and especially look great paired with a shorter crop top. 

Button-Up Shirts

It is almost impossible to wear long sleeves during the summer in Texas, but button-up long sleeve shirts are worth a little bit of sweat. Putting a cropped tank top underneath a button-up and tying it up at the bottom makes a good outfit to easily throw on. 

Photo by Vitaliy Izonin on Pexel

Platform Sandals

Platforms have definitely been in this year, from platform sneakers to platform boots. Sandals can sometimes be a little boring, so adding one with a platform to an outfit can not only make you look taller, but also elevate what would be an otherwise boring sandal look. 

Low-rise 

Even though high-rise barely came back into fashion– low-rise gets a lot of hate. However, low-rise pants and shorts are in for this summer and possibly for this upcoming fall and spring. There are definitely more low-rise denim and cargo shorts in-store than ever before.

Don’t be scared to try some of these trends because you may end up actually liking them! However, you don’t need to follow all the summer trends to have a great wardrobe. Wear what you want to wear no matter if it’s in or not.  

11 Moving Tips to Consider During Move-Out

As the academic school year is winding down and summer is fast approaching. That can only mean one thing; it’s the season for moving out! Getting to go back home is exciting, but the thought of having to transport all of your belongings within a certain time constraint can certainly be daunting. Students living on and off-campus will soon have to pack up all their belongings to make the journey back home. Here are some things you can consider before and during the packing process. 

  1. Start packing ahead of time. 

This might seem insignificant at first, but getting a head start can never do any harm. Many students think that moving out won’t take too much time, but there is definitely more work to be done than one might initially assume. It is easier to pack little by little instead of trying to cram everything in random boxes the day before moving out.

  1. Make a mental list of everything that you need to do.

 This is another step that might seem like a waste of time, but I can assure you; it is definitely important and worthwhile! Students are so used to seeing their room that they get desensitized to how much stuff they actually have. Think back to extra supplies, miscellaneous furniture/appliances, seasonal clothes, and other trinkets that you might have tucked away in drawers or closets out of sight. Do a scan of your space and re-familiarize yourself with all your possessions. 

  1. Learn to let go of items you aren’t/haven’t used. 

Throw away all the items you’ve been hoarding throughout the semester. Yes, this means you have to take out the trash that you’ve been too lazy to take out. Make sure to scan your room and get rid of anything that you don’t need to eliminate unnecessary items that take up space. You’ll be surprised at how much good a bit of decluttering can do to your mental state.

  1. Separate your things from your roommate’s belongings. 

Although not everyone has a roommate, it can be applied to everyone in different contexts. If you do have a roommate, it is important to talk to them to decide who will take previously shared appliances/goods. Even if you live alone, make sure to go around looking for objects that your friends might have forgotten in your space or items that you’ve previously borrowed and never given back. 

  1. Use big boxes separated into different categories so that it is easy to differentiate the items when reopening them back at home.

Not everyone has the resources to pack in big moving boxes, but sticking to containers with a solid structure is always recommended when making a big move. It’s easier to carry out in the short term, easier to manage and reduces the chances of damage during the transportation process.

  1. Make sure to have labels on everything after categorizing your belongings.

This might take some time in the beginning, but it will be useful in the end when you have to find something really quickly. Categorizing items also makes it easier to pack since everything has a given place it needs to be. It is really tempting to skimp on this step during the process, but naming boxes/containers will save you more time in the long run especially when you unpack. 

  1. Make use of towels, clothes, and other soft linen items to act like bubble wrap/packing peanuts. 

Anything that takes up less space is useful, and in this case, it can also save some money. Instead of investing in bubble wrap or foam to shelter the more fragile or glass items, substitute it for things you already have to pack: thick padded sweaters, fluffy towels, fuzzy socks, etc. 

  1. Roll up clothes, towels, blankets, and any other foldable item.

The biggest thing about packing to make a big move is to optimize space. Although everyone has their personal preferred style of folding clothing items, I highly recommend the rolling method during move-out. Rolling up clothing items tightly will save so much space, and the compact style makes it easier to move around. 

  1. Heavier items on the bottom, lighter items on the top.

This might seem like common sense, but it’s amazing how much we can forget when we are rushing in order to get the moving part over with. Unless you want to be dealing with bent or broken items, it is smart to always keep in mind that heavier things go on the bottom of the boxes. Yes– this means that you have to empty out the box and restart when you find something towards the end of packing that needs to be packed at the bottom. 

  1. Make use of school backpacks, duffel bags, etc.

Have all the essential items that you use the most in your backpack, like your laptop, phone, chargers, and earphones since things can get hectic and lost during the process of moving out. This also means that all your other bags can have a role too. Many students pack away unused bags into boxes, but why not make use of them? Bags are designed to store belongings in a contained space while also making them easier to transport. 

  1. Avoid being lazy and throwing everything in one box.

This might sound like something that is obvious, but moving can be mentally and physically draining. This also means that giving up is a temptation that will constantly nag you in the back of your mind. Definitely try to avoid shoving everything in boxes in an unorganized manner due to frustration. 

Everyone has been through the stressful process of moving, and sometimes it might feel like giving in to the anxiety is an easy fix. Worry not; take a deep breath and continue on slowly. Put on some relaxing music or a podcast you enjoy in the background while working, and it’s okay to take it step by step slowly. When starting, it might seem like there is no end to the monumental  task but remember, there is always a rewarding end waiting at the finish line for each journey!

Physical Signs of Stress

Stress levels are at an all-time high this time of year, especially with final exams right around the corner. Most people experience physical symptoms of stress but they don’t always know how to identify them or, more importantly, how to manage them. This article discusses common physical responses to stress, and some strategies for stress relief.

Trouble sleeping

When I’m overly stressed, one of my biggest indicators of that stress  is when I’m having trouble sleeping. I have found that limiting screen time half an hour before bed has been most effective in combating this. I also keep an emergency supply of melatonin gummies on my bedside table and wear a sleep mask at night. When you’re exhausted, your reactions to other stressful situations are  likely to be exacerbated , so getting enough sleep is crucial.

Headaches

Headaches are a common symptom of stress and can sometimes be the most debilitating symptom. Speaking from experience, I can hardly focus when I’m down with a bad headache, which ends up stressing me out even more. Advil is great for short-term relief, but there are other things you can do to prevent stress-related headaches from occurring in the first place. Drinking water, getting enough sleep, and eating healthy, balanced meals have proven really effective in combatting these headaches.

Rapid Heartbeat

Many people experience an elevated heart rate when they’re experiencing high-stress levels. This is mainly because our bodies release cortisol and adrenaline in response to stress. One of the most common remedies for this symptom is listening to relaxing music during stressful tasks. Other techniques include practicing breathing exercises, meditation, and yoga.

Most college students experience stress throughout the entire semester, but especially towards  its  end with the approaching deadlines, final grades, and semester exams. It can take a huge toll on your ability to function in day-to-day life, so it’s important to know when stress is  becoming a problem and learn how to manage it.

Podcasts to Listen to When You’re Feeling Bleh

This is the first “normal” Spring semester UT has had since the start of the pandemic. It might feel overwhelming to be back, even after experiencing the fall semester, and some of us may feel burnt out after the additional toll of midterms. Now some of us are dreading the final exams and projects coming up. 

I’ve heard that you shouldn’t rely on motivation and instead develop the discipline to get things done. However, I am not feeling motivated to do that either, which is why I listen to podcasts when I need an extra boost of confidence. Here are some of my favorites (unranked):

Let’s Talk About Mental Health 

This podcast provides advice to help you better your well-being. Understanding how your brain thinks can help you figure out ways to push through the obstacles you may face during a stressful semester. 

The Mindful Kind

I love listening to these episodes while I’m waiting for the bus or riding the bus because they’re not long (most are under 10 minutes), so I don’t need to worry about pausing or not finishing the episode.

We Can Do Hard Things with Glennon Doyle

I seriously cannot tell you how many times I’ve told myself, “I can do hard things,” and then have been able to do them. It’s my favorite mantra especially when I feel overwhelmed or when imposter syndrome is affecting my schoolwork

These next ones are for my neurodivergent ADHD baddies:

ADHD for Smart Ass Women

In this podcast, Tracy Otsuka covers topics that are relatable to people with ADHD and brings on guests to share their experiences with ADHD and how it has affected their lives, and in turn how their lives have affected their ADHD.

Catie and Erik’s Infinite Quest

Catie and Erik are a fun duo who get together to talk about the experiences that a neurodivergent person may relate to. They have over two million followers on TikTok put together, where they both advocate for ADHD. Catie’s TikTok is @catieosaurus and Erik’s is @heygude.

These podcasts have taught me to be mindful of the way my environment, the people I surround myself with, and the way I talk to myself affect the other areas of my life, namely my academic life because I over-identify with it, but at least I’m self-aware.

Featured Image By Brianna Martinez

How To De-stress: Burnout Edition

It’s that point in the semester where everything seems dreadful and mentally draining. So here’s a gentle reminder that it’s okay to take a break from schoolwork and relax. What are some ways to do that? You’ve come to the right place because I’ve got a list!

  1. Watch something you love: 

We’ve all got a comfort show that always puts us in a good mood. Having a good laugh can help relieve stress after tense study sessions. Even if it isn’t a comedy, watching something that makes you happy is what matters, whether that be true crime or cartoons. Pro tip: anything on Disney + is great for a pick-me-up, tbh.

  1. Read

Sometimes we’re so caught up in homework that we disregard the nine unread books that lie idly sitting on our shelf. Try reading one of them, or maybe finishing the one you already started. Reading books is a good way to pass time, and forget about everything else happening in the world. You’re stuck in someone else’s fantasy when you read, hopefully, a good one. And hey, at least it’s not your schoolwork! 

  1. Enjoy your favorite comfort foods

Just the other day, I made matcha-white chocolate chip cookies with my sister and instantly felt better after eating them. After hours of homework, eating something nice is rewarding. Treat yourself, even if that means ordering that expensive Uber Eats meal. Trust me; you deserve it

  1. Play a fun game

When I want a small break, I crack open the good ol’ Nintendo Switch and play a game. Lately, I’ve been playing “Kirby and the Forgotten Land” for a bit of fun before returning to homework. Of course, it doesn’t have just to console games but could be board games, cards, or whatever you find fun. Cool math games, anyone?

  1. Take a nap

Nothing feels better than a nice nap! Don’t force yourself to stay awake if you’re exhausted and haven’t gotten enough rest. Naps aren’t a waste of time if you use them wisely. Your work can wait till you’re in a better mental and physical state. Go rest!

  1. Let it out! 

When in doubt, scream, sigh or sing, as it will all relieve that pent-up stress. If you’re able, go ahead and just let out a good scream. If not, sighing works too, as it relieves tension in the upper body. Maybe, you feel the need to sing your favorite song, such as “As It Was” by Harry Styles or “Pied Piper” by BTS (my current favorites). Doing so helps release endorphins and hormones like oxytocin, putting you in a better mood.

When things get tough as finals approach, make sure to take a break. Burnout hits pretty hard and can take a toll on your mental health. Everything on this list has personally helped me feel better during burnout season, and I hope it helps you too. Remember, you’ve got this, and we’re almost there!

Featured Image By Morgan Scruggs