g.fastcompany.net

Is Smoking A Little Too Fun Fun Fun?


By Kayla Meyertons

Share on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterShare on TumblrPin on PinterestPrint this page

Once again, Austin shines as the music capital of the world with its upcoming music and comedy festival, Fun Fun Fun Fest, to be hosted at Auditorium Shores on November 6-8, 2015.

musicfestivaljunkies.com

musicfestivaljunkies.com



Unlike Austin City Limits with its plethora of famous acts (I see you, Drizzy), Fun Fun Fun Fest is structured to help new musical artists experience larger audiences and prepare for the national stage.

FFF also maintains the culture of Austin with plenty of food trucks, live music and beer drinking for all its customers.

The Austin City Council, nonetheless, called for a special meeting at the end of October to authorize temporary designated smoking areas under City Code Section 10-6-3(A)(11) at the festival.

Councilman Don Zimmerman publicly opposes smoking but feels the government does not have the right to dictate the decisions of an individual.

On May 7, 2005, Austin citizens voted to ban smoking in almost all public places, including bars music venues, and bowling alleys in the city.

As 2015 marks the 10-year anniversary of the ban, local business owners were questioned on how the change affected their companies.

“After 10 years of a smoke free music venue I can safely say that everyone is happy and business is good,” John Ables, owner of Saxon Pub, told reporters. “Staff is happy, musicians are very happy and our smoking customers have adjusted very well thanks to the patio.”

listen2mysmile.com

listen2mysmile.com



The future of the ban is still unclear. For more information, click here.