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Three Researchers That Should Move To Texas


By Hojun Choi

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Gov. Greg Abbott announced last week that he will be spending a butt load of money, $38 million, on trying to attract top researchers from around the nation to Texas universities. Here is my fantasy list of scientists that I think should make their way to the Lone Star State, preferably the Forty Acres.

ASU: College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

ASU: College of Liberal Arts & Sciences

Lawrence M. Krauss, Theoretical Physicist

I’m not much of a science guy, but this guy could go toe-to-toe with Bill Nye when it comes to theoretical physics. He’s written books on the physics and science of Star Trek and is famous for his theories on the birth of the universe. Currently, Krauss works at Arizona State University, and was making a little more than $200,000 a year in 2010. I don’t know how much that figure has changed over the last five years, but I think Texas can call that bet.

Twitter

Twitter

Bill Nye, The Science Guy

Not only was Nye the best part of our middle school science classes, he is a respected educator and a champion and advocate of science, technology, engineering and math. As the executive director of The Planetary Society, a nonprofit dedicated to education and promotion of space exploration, he oversees projects like scanning the skies for dangerous asteroids and looking for planets like Earth. Seeing as how the University of Texas just named astronomy professor Dr. Daniel Jaffe its new vice president for research, it could be a great fit for Nye.

Parade

Parade

Neil deGrasse Tyson, Astrophysicist, UT Alumnus

Tyson, in addition to his many contributions to astronomy, is widely recognized for his role as the host of the television show Cosmos, a reboot of the 1980 show of the same name. He is the director of the famous Hayden Planetarium in New York and has what seems to be a pretty sweet research gig at the American Museum of Natural History. During his tenure as the director of the planetarium, he caught media attention after announcing that Pluto was no longer classified as a planet. Maybe Tyson would be interested in the University of Texas’ McDonald Observatory in West Texas, and being closer to the university where he earned his masters.

Getting all of these scientists to move their work to universities in Texas would undoubtedly attract talent to the state, but I think we all know which Texas university they would enjoy most. And if they all lived in one state, they could have more mind blowing lectures like the one below!